daydreaming

I daydream a lot. It's a way to keep my mind occupied when I'm reading the same story for the fifth time in a row or washing dishes or walking to the park or any one of the million other things that keep me busy but not mentally stimulated. I wish I could say that my daydreaming will one day lead to the invention of a car that runs on trash or a genius act of diplomacy that will solve our problems in the Middle East or some other great thing that will save the world. I hate to disappoint, but I'm afraid my daydreaming is pretty centered on mundane, domestic things. I plan knitting projects for me and my children and all my preggo friends (and Stuart, because I totally owe him a sweater). I imagine my ideal vegetable garden, complete with a white-washed stone path meandering through the perennial herbs (actually, that was my mom's idea). I fantasize having enough time to run 4 miles a day like I used to. Occasionally, I pretend I'm a superhero, but anymore beating up the bad guys with mad martial arts skillz sounds way less appealing than five minutes of quiet with a glass of wine.

I also think about what life will be like in a few years when Daniel and Anya are older. Of course I don't know what the future holds, where we'll be living or what we'll be doing, and I can't entirely predict how their personalities will develop (though I think I'm starting to get a good idea). This time now can be awfully sweet, you know. As exhausting as it is to be the center of their lives, I wouldn't trade it for anything. But there are things I won't be sorry to leave behind, like cleaning up poop and fruitless arguments about whether it is or is not too early in the day to watch TV (come to think of it, that particular topic will probably be an issue for many a year...)

The other day, I rented the movie Charlotte's Web to watch with Daniel when he wasn't feeling well. I don't think he necessarily followed the story, though he really enjoyed it; silly animal antics are guaranteed to catch a toddler's attention, I guess. I liked it well enough, and I had a rush of nostalgia watching the story unfold. I read Charlotte's Web many times as a kid; it's one of my favorites. I realized, watching the movie, that I am really looking forward to a time when we can read chapter books together at bedtime. Goodnight, Moon is fine, but you know...it's also nice to have some real plot development.

I'm not sure where I'm going with this, so I think I'll just leave you with a question. What do you daydream about? The future? Being a superhero? The perfect vacation?

Comments

Caffeine Girl said…
I read something last week about there being more evidence that daydreaming is an important activity for your brain. It feeds creativity, even when you're not actively planning something creative.

Chapter books. You are so right to look forward to that time. I LOVED the bedtime routine: reading aloud in my bed with a child snuggled up on each side.

I would give anything to spend an hour with my toddlers again -- but as much as I loved that time, I am glad it's limited. It is exhausting!
Currently I daydream about how to decorate the little house, mentally putting different color combinations together, how to arrange the furniture, and mulling over whether or not to cover up the carpet that didn't get replaced with throw rugs, because the carpet is sad. This, of course, leads to the inevitable daydreaming about getting a job that pays enough for me to be able to buy the stuff I want to decorate the house, have money to actually start a college fund for Jamie, start a retirement fund, save money for a house of my own to buy, etc. etc. etc. Pretty boring, but those are my daydreams.
Tooz said…
On the subject of chapter books: We were reading chapter books aloud to Everett when he was about 4, so you don't have long to wait to read them to Daniel.
Animal said…
I don't have any real daydreams to share, but I'm with you on the chapter books. Naturally Rozzle's shelves are WAY overfilled with these kinds of books already, so I don't know what I'm going to do when I "need" to buy some more…ah well, a worry for another day. Maybe I'll daydream about a bigger house…

Incidentally, "Charlotte's Web" was my SECOND favorite White book; "Stuart Little" was last, and I always thought the best was the little-noted "Trumpet of the Swan." Ever read that one?
Suze said…
Yes, I read Trumpet of the Swan and loved it!
Mrs. Allroro said…
We read chapter books in my class, and my students start at 3, sometimes 2 3/4. I just have to remind them every day before we start how they should sit, what to do with their hands, and the state of their ears, eyes, and mouths. (Cross your legs, hands are tucked, ears listening, mouths quiet, eyes looking at the book), and we also go through a routine of questions about the book: What is the name of the series? Who is the author of the series? Who is the illustrator of the series? What is the name of this book? Who are the main characters? And most recently, What is the setting of this book? Gets them in listening mode, and you can work up from one chapter a day, or even less, and try to discourage questions and comments throughout (by pausing and closing the book, or just ignoring the raised hand) until you are finished reading, and then you can ask questions. Builds attention span.

I can imagine you are looking forward to the day when you can also discuss the chapter books.
Forgot to mention that I LURVE the new picture of the kiddos in your blog header!
Jessi said…
Typing holding 6 month old, please forgive lack of grammar. Love the new header pic. Daydream about fixing up the house, boaok tours, etc. Also, Brynna and I have been reading chapter books together for about a year. Here is my advice, just do it. But don't start with the really great stuff like Charlotte's Web. Start with something mediocre with about 10 chapters that are all sort of short and uniform in length. hate Junie B. Jones, but they are great to start with. Now, we can do almost anyhthing but I started with Rold Dahl and it was pretty miserable, just too different every night and it turns out three year olds are scared of giant parent eating hippos.
Mrs. Allroro said…
We read the Magic Tree House books most of the time. (Brother and sister travel through time through books) Junie B also works, though sometimes I feel the need to substitute words. (She says things like shoot and her grandpa drinks beer. Fine for most families, but not for some. On the other hand, magic is not fine for some families, and the Magic Tree House has lots of that.) She has poor grammar, but is much funnier than Jack and Annie. They're a little dull, but also educational. I've heard Katie Kazoo is good. Cam Jansen is another series I've heard is good. You could try Chronicles of Narnia or Whinnie the Pooh. I think anything that is a bit predictable would be great. (Magic Tree House has chapters that follow patterns and also has repeated phrases in every book, like "It spun faster and faster. Then everything was still. Absolutely still." and they always "took off". They don't "dash" or "Scatter". Always "took off".)
Tooz said…
What about the Ramona books? They were great chapter reads, funny, no real problems with language. We did the Hardy Boys and Bobbsey Twins with Everett. They were really predictable. David would start reading, say, "Chapter 5", and Everett would chime in, "In which Chet disappears".

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